Jul 30

Predicting heart disease in women

Posted by: Administrator in News |

http://www.wzzm13.com/story/news/local/grand-rapids-central/2014/07/26/predicting-heart-disease-in-women/13104335/

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women and knowing the signs of it can help save your life. Dr. Robyn Hubbard with Grand Rapids (Mich.) Women's Health talks about how to predict that a woman could have a heart attack. The most common symptom is some type of pain, pressure or discomfort in the chest. However, they are more likely to have symptoms unrelated to chest pain.

 

Jul 30

Running of any length or speed reduces risk of death

Posted by: Administrator in Sports |

http://www.king5.com/health/Running-of-any-length-or-speed-reduces-risk-of-death-268963821.html

Whether you run 30 minutes a week or two hours a week, your risk of early death will be the same — better than if you don't run. Researchers found that running, no matter the duration or speed, will reduce mortality risk by about 30% compared with non-runners.

Running of any length or speed reduces risk of death

Contrary to the 150 minutes of moderate exercise or the 75 minutes of vigorous exercise per week recommended by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, a study published Monday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that people who run less than hour a week have the same health benefits as people who run more, regardless of sex, age, body mass index, health conditions or smoking status.
"More (running) may not be better in relation to health benefits," said Duck-chul Lee, assistant professor at Iowa State University and lead author of the study.
Runners had a 30% lower risk of death overall and a 45% lower risk of death from heart disease or stroke than non-runners, according to the report. On average, runners lived three years longer than non-runners.
"The study tells us that doing some exercise is clearly better than doing none at all," said Clyde Yancy, a professor at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine and a cardiologist with the American Heart Association.
Running consistently can even balance out other mortality risk factors, which include obesity, high blood pressure and smoking, said Carl Lavie, a cardiologist and co-author of the study. The researchers did additional analysis to examine the importance of running and physical fitness compared with other mortality predictors and found that it outweighed even smoking and obesity.
"Fitness largely negates adverse effects of other cardiological risk factors," Lavie said. "Fitness may be the strongest predictor of survival."

The study examined more than 50,000 adults between 18 and 100 over a period of 15 years. The researchers used data from the Aerobics Center Longitudinal Study, where participants completed a questionnaire about their running habits. In the sample, about 24% of participants reported running as part of their leisure-time exercise.
Researchers also found that participants who persistently ran over a period of six years had the most significant health benefits, with a 29% lower risk of overall death and 50% lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease.
The study only examined running as a leisure-time exercise, but Lavie said the physical exercise could be translated to other activities, such as biking or walking. However, running is "more intense" than those activities and would require people to walk two times farther than if they ran, and three to four times farther if they bike.
Lavie advised people who want to start running to start slow with walking, then introducing jogging and running. The perfect amount of exercise would still be 30 to 40 minutes a day, Lavie said, but this study showed that people would still get reduced mortality risk with just five minutes a day.
"(The study gives) comforting information for people whose frequent excuse for not running is they don't have enough time," Lavie said.










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Jul 30

Many colon cancer diagnoses come from the ER

Posted by: Administrator in News |

http://www.nwcn.com/news/oregon?fId=268538402&fPath=/home&fDomain=10202

Legacy Health pf Portland Ore. kept track of the numbers and found 48 percent of stage 4 colorectal cancers and 30 percent of those at stage 3 are detected because of visits to the emergency room. “Two-thirds of these patients were not up to date or never had any kind of screening,” said Legacy gastro-intestinal specialist Dr. Harald Schoeppner. He says some patients ignore symptoms of severe constipation, blood, fatigue and weight loss. “I’m very passionate about this because in my opinion this has become a preventable disease,” he added.

 

Jul 30

New Test Predicts Which Chemicals Could Cause Cancer

Posted by: Administrator in News |

http://www.voanews.com/content/new-test-predicts-which-chemicals-could-cause-cancer/1964738.html

Many chemicals have been linked to the development of cancer, but the cancer-causing potential of thousands of others is unknown. Now researchers have developed a simple test that can identify which chemicals have negative long-term health effects.

FILE - Soaps containing the antibacterial chemical triclosan on a store shelf at a Minneapolis pharmacy.
pensive.

There are some 80,000 chemical compounds on the market worldwide.

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Jul 30

Cancer drug helps some women get pregnant

Posted by: Administrator in News |

http://www.futurity.org/cancer-drug-helps-women-get-pregnant-737592/

A new fertility drug, originally developed to prevent the recurrence of breast cancer, is 30 percent more effective in helping some women become pregnant than one used for more than 40 years, new research shows.

For a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, researchers at seven different academic centers recruited 750 couples to compare the long-used fertility drug clomiphene citrate, commonly called clomid, to letrozole.

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Jul 30

Busy emergency rooms better for sickest patients

Posted by: Administrator in News |

http://www.futurity.org/sickest-patients-busy-ers-best-survival-odds-733572/

If all emergency patients received the kind of care that the busiest emergency centers give, 24,000 fewer people would die each year, new research suggests.

A new study shows that patients admitted to a hospital after an emergency have a 10 percent lower chance of dying if they go to one of the nation’s busiest emergency departments, compared to the least busy.

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Jul 29

Volvo's new road-sensing safety features go the extra mile

Posted by: Administrator in News |

http://www.cbc.ca/news/technology/volvo-s-new-road-sensing-safety-features-go-the-extra-mile-1.2716742

Swedish automaker's 'world-first' plans praised, but 'drivers still need to be good drivers.'

Volvo's new XC90 will have technology that features automatic braking if the driver turns left (or right in left-hand traffic) in front of an oncoming car.Volvo's new XC90 will have technology that features automatic braking if the driver turns left (or right in left-hand traffic) in front of an oncoming car. (Volvo Cars of Canada)
 

A drowsy driver is about to drift off the road when suddenly the seat belt tightens, or extra torque is applied to the steering wheel and the vehicle pulls itself back on track.

Or maybe a driver is turning in front of an unseen oncoming car when on-board radar and a tiny camera prompt the brakes to kick in automatically, avoiding a collision.

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Jul 29

Fist bumps spread fewer germs than handshakes, study says

Posted by: Administrator in News |

http://www.cbc.ca/news/health/fist-bumps-spread-fewer-germs-than-handshakes-study-says-1.2720493

Fist bumping transfers about 90 per cent less bacteria than handshakes.

U.S. President Barack Obama has continually opted for the fist bump instead of the riskier traditional handshake.U.S. President Barack Obama has continually opted for the fist bump instead of the riskier traditional handshake.
 

Ditching handshakes in favor of more informal fist bumps could help cut down on the spread of bacteria and illnesses, according to a study released on Monday. 

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Jul 29

Vegetarian or flexitarian: How much meat do you really want to give up? (View Clip at bottom)

Posted by: Administrator in News |

http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/vegetarian-or-flexitarian-how-much-meat-do-you-really-want-to-give-up-1.2713709

Consumers have varying definitions of what it means to be a vegetarian.

Jess Abramson relaxes next to a scale loaded with chops made from sweet potatoes at her family's shop in Toronto's Little Italy neighbourhood.Jess Abramson relaxes next to a scale loaded with chops made from sweet potatoes at her family's shop in Toronto's Little Italy neighbourhood. (Bruce Reeve/CBC)
 

When the vegetarian "butcher shop" YamChops started offering customers burgers made from black beans and lox crafted from carrots, the owners were hoping their plant-based fare would find favor among their anticipated clientele, the vegetarians and vegans who came into the store in Toronto's Little Italy neighbourhood.

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Jul 29

Debate over health benefit of raw food heats up

Posted by: Administrator in News |

http://www.king5.com/health/Debate-over-health-benefit-of-raw-food-heats-up-268372942.html

Heat and eat or pop in your mouth, straight from the farm? The debate over the health benefits of eating raw foods is heating up.

Debate over health benefit of raw food heats upCredit: KING  

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